Wej It Fastening Systems
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Question Mark  What are the ways an anchor (or the concrete) can fail?

Question Mark  What is the best anchor for vibratory load conditions?

Question Mark  Can I specify core-drilled holes for Wej-It anchors?

Question Mark  Which Wej-It Adhesives can be installed in holes that are damp, wet or water filled?

Question Mark  Can Wej-It Inject-TITE Epoxy be used with smooth rods?

Question Mark  Can I remove Wej-It Anchor-TITE wedge anchors?

Question Mark  What does "ICC-ES" (formerly ICBO) stand for?

Question Mark  What ICC-ES reports do you have?

Question Mark  What is "Anchor Spacing"?

Question Mark  What is "Edge Distance"?

Question Mark  Are all anchors set with A.N.S.I bits and why?

Question Mark  When do you use a Sleeve Anchor versus a Stud Anchor?

Question Mark  Will Stud Anchors work in block walls?

Question Mark  Why would you use a Slam-TITE instead of a Stud Anchor?

Question Mark  Can a Stud Anchor be removed and, if so, how?

Question Mark  Do you have MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) available?

Question Mark  Do you sell glue or goop that is used to glue anchors into Concrete?




Question Mark  What are the ways an anchor (or the concrete) can fail?
Check out Anchor Failure Modes for answers to this question.
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Question Mark  What is the best anchor for vibratory load conditions?
Although expansion anchors can be utilized under some vibratory conditions, the Inject-TITE Epoxy formula is the best choice. The POWER-Sert should be used in conjunction with the Inject-TITE Epoxy for those applications where a finished head may be required or desirable. The Chemical Capsules and Slam-TITE Hammer-In Capsules are also excellent choices in a dynamic load environment.
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Question Mark  Can I specify core-drilled holes for Wej-It anchors?
Core drilled holes can be specified for Inject-TITE Epoxy because of its excellent wetting characteristics and minimal shrinkage properties. It can be used with no loss of load capacity. Wej-It expansion anchors are not recommended for use with core-drilled holes.
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Question Mark  Which Wej-It Adhesives can be installed in holes that are damp, wet or water-filled?
Only the Inject-TITE Structural Epoxy can be used in wet and water filled holes provided some simple installation steps are followed. For wet or water-filled holes either the water must be removed or care must be taken to ensure that the injected adhesive totally displaces the water in the hole. Trapped water will reduce the holding performance of the adhesive. For all installation conditions the standard hole cleaning procedures must be followed.
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Question Mark  Can Wej-It Inject-TITE Epoxy be used with smooth rods?
Yes, under some conditions Inject-TITE can be used under some shear only load conditions. For example, the doweling of a new slab to an existing slab. Wej-It does NOT recommend the use of adhesives for tension load applications using smooth rod. Where tension loads exist, the embedded anchor material must be all thread rod or deformed bar. Wej-It adhesives, as well as nearly all other manufacturers' adhesives, use mechanical bonding between the anchor body (all thread rod or deformed bar) and the adhesive. Using a smooth rod virtually eliminates the mechanical bond between the anchor body and the adhesive, which greatly reduces the tension load capacity of the anchoring system.
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Question Mark  Can I remove Wej-It Anchor-TITE wedge anchors?
Wej-It Ankr-TITE anchors can be removed using one of two methods. Core drill around the anchor and remove the core/anchor. Use hydraulic equipment to pull the anchor out of the hole. However, for the anchor to be removed by this method, there will probably be surface spalling and damage to the inside circumference of the base material hole. Also, there is a possibility that the anchor will break, leaving a portion of the body in the hole.
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Question Mark  What does "ICC-ES" (formerly ICBO) stand for?
It stands for International Code Council - Evaluation Service. ICC-ES is an evaluation service that takes independent test data for a variety of products and analyses it against a set of uniform Acceptance Criteria that is recognized internationally.

Concrete anchors are generally accepted under AC193 and found to be in compliance with the IBC (International Building Code), or IRC (International Residential Code) criteria.
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Question Mark  What ICC-ES reports do you have?
ESR-2777 - Ankr-TITE CCAT wedge anchor for cracked and uncracked concrete
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Question Mark  What is "Anchor Spacing"?
Generally speaking, anchor spacing is the distance required between the centerline of two installed anchors to achieve maximum performance of the anchors. To completely understand anchor this you must recognize that most mechanical style anchors are held in with friction. The reaction of tensile forces creates a spall cone when the friction overcomes the concrete's ability to resist during failure. Correct spacing insures that the cones do not interact and thus reduce the performance between anchors. Refer to the manufacturers' recommendation for proper edge requirements.
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Question Mark     What is "Edge Distance"?
Edge distance is the distance from an edge to the centerline of an installed anchor. Remember that cracks and control expansion joints count as edges. As is the case with Spacing, specifc edge distances are required to achieve maximum performance of the anchors. Reduced edge distances will result in lower anchor performance and can induce concrete failure when the proximity of the installed anchor is too close to the free edge. Refer to the manufacturers' recommendation for proper edge requirements.
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Question Mark  Are all anchors set with A.N.S.I bits and why?
A.N.S.I. stands for American National Standards Institute. This organization exists to set national standards so that you can be assured of consistent dimensional reliability from manufacturer to manufacturer. Most anchors are tested using bits made to these standards and you as an end user will want to stay within the standards' dimensional limits to insure that you will achieve the performance you are expecting from your anchor. Nearly all anchor manufacturers recommend the use of A.N.S.I. B212.15 Standard for carbide tipped drill bits. Metric drill bits generally do not fall within the dimensions set in A.N.S.I. B212.15 for carbide drill bits.
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Question Mark  When do you use a Sleeve Anchor versus a Stud Anchor?
There are many concrete applications where it is perfectly fine to use either a sleeve or a stud anchor. This decision should be based on performance requirements and base material. But, typically, you would not use a stud anchor in hollow block. The sleeve anchor comes in a variety of heads besides the hex head. You can get sleeves with acorn nut, flat, round and rod coupling head styles to meet many applications and decorative needs.
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Question Mark  Will Stud Anchors work in block walls?
Stud anchors are not recommended for use in hollow block walls. Some manufacturers do allow their use in grout filled walls and provide greatly reduced performance data for such uses. Generally, the stud anchor is not recommended for use in hollow block walls.
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Question Mark  Why would you use a Slam-TITE instead of a Stud Anchor?
The Slam-TITE anchor is simpler to install than the stud anchor and has the ability of yielding increased performance because high strength rod can be used in various applications. The Slam-TITE has closer spacing and edge distance requirements than the stud anchor and thus allows installation closer to a joint or edge. It is not recommended to use Slam-TITE anchors in core-drilled holes and, as with all chemical adhesive type anchors, hole cleanliness is very important. Hole cleanliness is important because overall performance can be severely affected by an unclean hole. Slam-TITE, along with other adhesives, is usually a better choice for applications where vibration could influence the anchor, and debris is less likely to be trapped around an adhesive anchor.
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Question Mark  Can a Stud Anchor be removed and, if so, how?
Generally speaking stud anchors will not come out without damage to the concrete except in deep embedments when pulled out in tension hydraulically. But this is not universally true as subsurface spalling can still occur. A stud anchor can be core drilled out or cut flush to the surface. If the original hole was drilled in the base material deep enough, a stud can be driven down into the hole, but the anchor is rendered useless at that point. Finally, if the hole was drilled through the base material during the initial installation, a stud can be driven down through the material.
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Question Mark  Do you have MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) available?
Yes, they are available in PDF format at
"MSDS/CPSC" (click here)
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Question Mark  Do you sell glue or goop that is used to glue anchors into concrete?
Do you sell glue or goop that is used to glue anchors into Concrete? The answer is YES! Our line of adhesives are very versatile and flexible. Inject-TITE epoxies features 3 different formulas to meet any application or need.
Fast-Set & Standard-Set are epoxies that do not shrink, are not sensitive to water, are solvent free, can be used in seismic areas, do not sag, and can be used in severe exterior weather conditions. AWF (All Weather Formula) is an acrylic epoxy that works well in all base materials, sets up in water-filled or damp holes, has a very fast cure time, cleans up easily, pumps easily at very low temperatures, and has a huge working range from minus 15 degrees Fahrenheit to plus 120 degrees F. All of these adhesives have a variety of available sized containers and mixing nozzles to meet construction needs from the largest skyscraper to a weekend project at home. Click here: Epoxies
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